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At the Jacksonville Historical Society, we’re making history every day. Our monthly Speakers Series offers in-depth information on surprising and diverse aspects of our city’s past, and our fun Pop Up events are designed to bring attention to the forgotten history buried in our own back yard. Throughout the year, we also lead countless school groups on “insider tours” of our city’s most significant landmarks and events. Why don’t you join us?

Dec
18
Fri
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 18 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
19
Sat
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 19 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
21
Mon
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 21 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
22
Tue
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 22 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
23
Wed
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 23 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Aug
9
Tue
2016
Elvis Has Left the Building
Aug 9 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

The 60th Anniversary of the King at the Florida Theatre1956-FlaThtr-Poster-Aug-320

Elvis performed in Jacksonville many times — once as an opening act for country music singer Hank Snow. But the Elvis appearances everyone still talks about sixty years later were August 10 and 11, 1956, when he headlined at the Florida Theatre. Judge Marion Gooding stood in the wings to insure Presley’s movements excluded hip twisting and grinding. We’ll hear from individuals who were in the audience or involved with the event.

Country music radio pioneer and concert promoter of the day, Marshall Rowland, knew Elvis and will offer firsthand accounts of “the King” in Jacksonville.

We’ll also here the story of Jacksonville’s Landon High English teacher, Mae Axton, who co-wrote the Elvis hit, Heartbreak Hotel.

Elvis is gone, but six decades later, Jacksonville still talks about his memorable local connections.

 

Free parking is available in the lot behind the Merrill House and Old St. Andrew’s, along Duval Street.
Security will be on duty.
Your guests are welcome.
A suggested donation for non-members is $5, students free with proper ID.

 

This program and the 2016-17 JHS program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A. Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Feb
3
Mon
2020
Florida’s First Historically Black College: 154 Years of Jacksonville’s Edward Waters College
Feb 3 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Commemorating Black History Month, the Jacksonville Historical Society will present “Florida’s First Historically Black College: 154 Years of Jacksonville’s Edward Waters College” at its February Speaker Series event, Monday, Feb. 3. Social hour 6 p.m., speaker 7 p.m. at the Milne Auditorium on the campus. The talk by Dr. David Jamison will explore how changes over time at Edward Waters also reflected broader social changes occurring over the same time in Jacksonville.

Mar
18
Wed
2020
Speaker Series: Remarkable Women in North Florida History
Mar 18 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Past JHS Executive Director Emily R. Lisska will share insights about remarkable women in North Florida History at a Lunch & Learn event during Women’s History Month. Doors open at 11 a.m., lecture begins at noon. Old St. Andrews, 317 A. Philip Randolph Blvd. Box lunches must be reserved; details to follow.

Apr
23
Thu
2020
Speaker Series: Joseph Lee, Jacksonville’s First Black Lawyer
Apr 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

The Honorable Brian J. Davis, United States District Court Judge, will be the guest speaker at the Jacksonville Historical Society’s April Speaker Series program. Davis’ topic will focus on Joseph E. Lee, Jacksonville’s first black lawyer. The event begins with a social hour at 6 p.m., followed by Judge Davis at 7 p.m. Free to JHS members; $10 suggested donation for non-members.

Copyright © 2019 by Jacksonville Historical Society

THE JACKSONVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY