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At the Jacksonville Historical Society, we’re making history every day. Our monthly Speakers Series offers in-depth information on surprising and diverse aspects of our city’s past, and our fun Pop Up events are designed to bring attention to the forgotten history buried in our own back yard. Throughout the year, we also lead countless school groups on “insider tours” of our city’s most significant landmarks and events. Why don’t you join us?

Dec
17
Thu
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 17 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
18
Fri
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 18 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
19
Sat
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 19 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
21
Mon
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 21 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
22
Tue
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 22 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
23
Wed
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 23 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Sep
29
Thu
2016
Banned in Jacksonville: What book are you missing?
Sep 29 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

According to the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom(OIF), “hundreds of books are challenged in schools and libraries in the United States each year. A challenge is an WH_BannedBooksattempt to remove or restrict materials, while a banning reflects the actual removal of those materials”. 275 challenges were recorded nationally during 2015. The OIF staff believes far more challenges occur, however, because reporting is not mandatory in all states.

In the Duval County School System alone, 300 book challenges have been reported from 1978 – 2012. The Jacksonville Public Library reports 70 challenges to materials (books, DVDs, etc.) since 2000.

Leslie Kirkwood, Chair of  Banned: A Community Conversation about Censorship and Free Speech will present crucial history and background and Barbara A. B. Gubbin, Director of Jacksonville Public Library in this important conversation.  The presentation also incorporates performances by Jason Woods, actor/director. The presentation will also highlight the history of the Nazi-era censorship and its relevance today; Banned Books Week; a review of national, local public school and public library challenges; and a discussion of First Amendment rights.

Leslie Kirkwood is is a current chair of Banned: Censorship and Free Speech (a series of public programs—community conversations—that examines the delicate balance between censorship and free speech) and Remembering for the Future Community Holocaust Initiative (an organization that focuses attention on Holocaust education and remembrance through educational resources, teacher training, major exhibitions and community programs.). She is also the Vice-President of Urban Dynamics Corporation, a member of the Friends of the Jacksonville Public Library and the former Executive Director of the Jacksonville Public Libraries Foundation.

The reception begins at 6:30pm with the program to follow at 7pm. Both events will be held at Old St. Andrew’s, 317 A. Philip Randolph Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32202.

Free parking is available in the lot behind the Merrill House and Old St. Andrew’s, along Duval Street.
Security will be on duty.
Your guests are welcome.
A suggested donation for non-members is $5, students free with proper ID.

This program and the 2016-17 JHS program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A. Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Sep
26
Tue
2017
Winterling and Weather: A North Florida View
Sep 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

George Winterling, Channel 4 meteorologist, reports on Hurricane Dora’s maneuvers, 1964.

In 1962, when George Winterling began as a meteorologist with Channel 4 television, broadcasts were black and white and reporting was live—no video tape. Prior to his 47 year career at WJCT, Mr. Winterling worked as a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Jacksonville. In 1964, he accurately predicted Hurricane Dora would hit North Florida. He’s also known for creating a humiture index—how hot it feels—today used nationwide and beyond as the”heat-index.” Rainfall predictability was another Winterling creation. He recalls television’s earliest Jacksonville broadcasts in 1949. So eager to see more, later as a student of Florida State University, he mounted an antenna on the chimney and watched Bill Grove’s “Eye on the News” from Tallahassee. By the time he retired from Channel 4 in 2009, he was a Jacksonville institution. In this presentation, you’ll learn more about Mr. WInterling-known to all as George-and more about North Florida’s weather history.

About the speaker

Born in New Jersey in 1931, George Winterling moved with his family to Jacksonville at age 10. He graduated from Lee High School. In 1949, he joined the United States Air Force and was sent to Weather Observers School at Chanute Air Force Base in Illinois. He eventually trained at Shemya Air Force Base in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands where he observed the Pacific’s killer storms. In 1957, he earned a meteorology degree from Florida State University and was employed for five years by the U.S. Weather Bureau (now called the National Weather Service) until he was pivotal in convincing Channel 4, they needed a meteorologist. A Mandarin resident, he married his wife Virginia in 1956.

Oct
10
Tue
2017
Charles Lindbergh in Jacksonville: The 90th Anniversary
Oct 10 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Charles Lindbergh Banquet Program at Hotel George Washington, 1927

He was the greatest celebrity on earth when he touched down in Jacksonville on October 27, 1927. Five months after Charles Lindbergh’s record setting transatlantic crossing, from New York to Paris, he landed in Jacksonville

to a hero’s welcome. He was piloting his famous plane, the Spirit of St. Louis. The local Lindbergh tribute “surpassed anything in state history,” said the city’s major newspaper, the Florida Times Union. It was all part of a victory tour, and Atlanta was his next stop, but not before more people than residents lined the city’s streets— just to get a glimpse of Lindbergh — as his motorcade was escorted from the new landing field on North Main Street to downtown. Jacksonville Historical Society Past-President Ed Booth, Jr., tells the little known stories of Lindbergh’s visit—and arguably the most dramatic “invitation delivery” in area history. Ninety years to the day, we examine an unforgettable moment in Jacksonville aviation.

About the speaker

Edward M. Booth Jr., is a partner at Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A. He received his B. A. degree from Emory University in 1978, and was awarded his Juris Doctorate from Florida State University College of Law in 1981. He served as chairman of The Florida Bar Aviation Law Certification Committee and The Florida Bar Aviation Law Committee. He was the 2007-8 President of the Lawyer Pilots Bar Association, a 1,200 member international association. He served on the Jacksonville Aviation Authority Board of Directors (2013-2015) and oversaw the operation of four local airports having a combined annual budget in excess of 80 million dollars. An experienced pilot, he holds a multi engine Air Transport License issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. Mr. Booth is a member of the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States and a frequent guest commentator of Jacksonville’s WJXT Channel 4 on topics related to aviation and air safety. He has also appeared on the news magazine Inside Edition and the Chinese network SZMG TV on matters related to recent air disasters.

 

Sep
29
Sat
2018
2018 Gingerbread Extravaganza Builder’s Workshop
Sep 29 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Calling All Gingerbread Builders!

The Jacksonville Historical Society is holding the 2018 Gingerbread Builder Workshop Saturday, September 29th from 10:00am – 12:00am and the Old St. Andrew’s, 317 A. Philip Randolph Blvd. We highly recommend Builders to attend the workshop but are not required to attend the workshop in order to participate in the event. We are happy that our Gingerbread Builder Veterans E.J. McIntyre and Sara Aicher have agreed to lead this workshop, sharing their tips and tricks to creating a gingerbread entry that will last.

As a reminder, the Gingerbread Builder Permit form submissions are due Thursday, September 27th and the creations are to be delivered to the Old St. Andrews either Monday, November 26, 12:00pm – 4:00pm or Tuesday, November 27, 8:00am – 3:00pm. We hope that those of you who have shown an interest in participating in this event for 2018 have submitted your Builder Permit form and are busy planning your wonderful creations.

Please RSVP for the Builder Workshop with our office at (904) 665-0064 or email gingerbread@jaxhistory.org

Copyright © 2019 by Jacksonville Historical Society

THE JACKSONVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY