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At the Jacksonville Historical Society, we’re making history every day. Our monthly Speakers Series offers in-depth information on surprising and diverse aspects of our city’s past, and our fun Pop Up events are designed to bring attention to the forgotten history buried in our own back yard. Throughout the year, we also lead countless school groups on “insider tours” of our city’s most significant landmarks and events. Why don’t you join us?

Dec
15
Tue
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 15 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
16
Wed
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 16 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
17
Thu
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 17 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
18
Fri
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 18 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
19
Sat
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 19 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
21
Mon
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 21 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
22
Tue
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 22 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Dec
23
Wed
2015
Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys
Dec 23 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Jacksonville Historical Society is presenting a new exhibit at the Merrill House during the Gingerbread Extravaganza. The exhibit titled “Playing with History: The Joys and Noise of 19th Century Toys” showcases period toys from the collections of the Lightner Museum in St. Augustine, the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) and the Jacksonville Historical Society.

Children have always played with toys. From archaeological digs we know that the earliest toys were made from materials found in nature, such as rocks, sticks, and clay. Thousands of years ago, Egyptian children played with dolls that had wigs and movable limbs which were made from stone, pottery, and wood. In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, children played with dolls made of wax or terracotta, sticks, bows and arrows, and yo-yos.

Manufactured toys became more widespread with the changing attitudes towards children engendered by the Enlightenment (1700s-1800s). Children began to be seen as people in and of themselves, as opposed to extensions of their families. They had a right to flourish and enjoy their childhood. The variety and number of toys that were manufactured during the 18th century steadily rose. Hoops, toy wagons, kites, spinning wheels, and puppets were popular toys.

In the nineteenth century, the emphasis was put on toys that had educational purpose to them, such as puzzles, books, cards and board games. Religiously themed toys were also popular, including a model Noah’s Ark with miniature animals and objects from other Bible scenes. With growing prosperity among the middle class, children had more leisure time on their hands, which led to the application of industrial methods to the manufacture of toys. More complex mechanical and optics-based toys were also invented. Wood and porcelain dolls in miniature doll houses were popular with middle class girls, while boys played with marbles and toy trains.

The golden age of toy development started at the turn of the 20th century. As wages rose, even working-class families could afford toys for their children. Mass production was able to provide the supply of toys to meet this rising demand. Intellectual emphasis was also increasingly being placed on the importance of a wholesome and happy childhood. Today dolls can recognize and identify objects and computerized games mimic reality. The materials that toys are made from have changed, what toys can do has changed, but the fact that children play with toys has not changed.

The Merrill House will be open during the Gingerbread Extravaganza, December 2nd through the 23rd, from 1:00 to 4:00pm, Monday through Saturday. A small donation is requested.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

Mar
30
Thu
2017
Florida’s Fleet: A Shrimping Legacy from the First Coast
Mar 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Shrimp boats in Jacksonville, Florida. © Florida Memory

The Jacksonville Historical Society and Brendan Burke, author and underwater archaeologist with the St. Augustine Historical Society and Museum‘s research center LAMP, will present a program on Florida’s Fleet: A Shrimping Legacy from the First Coast on Thursday, March 30th beginning with a reception at 6:30pm followed by the program at 7pm.

During the early 20th century, a new type of boat was born in Northeast Florida. Forged from Greek, Italian, Norwegian, African-American, and native Floridian hands, the Florida-style trawler became one of the most important boats in the state’s history. From 1919 until the mid-1980’s, Florida supplied the world with shrimp trawlers and commercial fishing boats of all types. In Northeast Florida, the enterprise grew into a multi-billion dollar industry that contributed to over 23 foreign fishing fleets. Ultimately, Florida would be responsible for the largest purpose-built wooden fishing fleet ever assembled.

We ask that you register for the event via Eventbrite. Please click the ticket icon above to register for you seat. You may also email or phone the society to make your reservation.

About the speaker

Brendan Burke, Archaeologist and Logistical Coordinator with LAMP.

Brendan Burke is a maritime archaeologist at the St. Augustine Lighthouse and Museum in the museum’s research wing, the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP). Since 2007, he has researched the commercial shrimping history of Florida, and in 2013 co-authored Shrimp Boat City with Ed Long, a St. Augustine native. When he is not researching commercial fishing, Brendan may be found underwater or onboard the research vessel ROPER, diving and excavating a shipwreck from the American Revolution off St. Augustine’s beach. He holds a B.A. in history/anthropology from Longwood University and an MA in historical archaeology from The College of William and Mary.

May
31
Wed
2017
Jacksonville’s Greatest Landmarks — Past, Present, Preserved and Endangered
May 31 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

In honor of National Preservation Month, Wayne W. Wood, the “godfather of Jacksonville History,” is speaker for the Jacksonville Historical Society annual meeting. Dr. Wood’s presentation explores Jacksonville’s greatest architectural gems, including amazing landmarks that are long gone, and his 25 favorite buildings existing in Northeast Florida. You” hear dramatic stories of local significant structures that have been rescued and preserved. Also covered during the presentation are Jacksonville’s most endangered buildings, which include some big surprises!

 

 

About the speaker

Dr. Wood, a retired optometrist, is author or editor of numerous books exploring Jacksonville’s history, including the best selling, Jacksonville’s Architectural Heritage: Landmarks for the Future (currently out-of-print). Other publications include, but are not limited to The Jacksonville Family Album: 150 Years of the Art of Photography, The Great Fire of 1901, The Architectural of Henry John Klutho: The Prairie School in Jacksonville, The Broward Family in Florida: From France to Florida, and The Living Heritage of Riverside and Avondale. A few remaining copies of The Jacksonville Family Album will be available for sale at the May 31 program along with other books by Dr. Wood, or purchase them online by clicking on the highlighted book name.

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