Top Navigation

Calendar

Events banner

At the Jacksonville Historical Society, we’re making history every day. Our monthly Speakers Series offers in-depth information on surprising and diverse aspects of our city’s past, and our fun Pop Up events are designed to bring attention to the forgotten history buried in our own back yard. Throughout the year, we also lead countless school groups on “insider tours” of our city’s most significant landmarks and events. Why don’t you join us?

Jul
14
Tue
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 14 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
15
Wed
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 15 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
16
Thu
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 16 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
21
Tue
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
22
Wed
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 22 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
23
Thu
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 23 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
28
Tue
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
29
Wed
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 29 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Jul
30
Thu
2015
Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective
Jul 30 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Leah Mary Cox: An Intimate Perspective is the small, but powerful exhibit largely culled from the works of amateur local photographer Leah Mary Cox, highlights the more intimate side of the photographer’s life.

Leah Mary Cox

Leah Mary Cox

At age 21, Leah Mary Cox arrived alone in Jacksonville during the wild excitement of the 1888 Subtropical Exhibition.  Soon, she was plunged into a world of quarantines and uncertainty as the Yellow Fever Epidemic spread through the city. During the end of the century, Cox acquired a “large, unwieldy, professional-type box camera set on a tripod.”  The camera involved the use of glass plate negatives, but did not demand immediate processing on site. From perches and peaks, Leah captured some of the area’s major sites; her images of the 1901 Fire’s aftermath is staggering; and she returned to the same  perches a few years later to mark the city’s  rebuilding effort.  She also created stunning images of family members, friends and the city’s people.

It was long after Leah’s death in 1953 at age 86, when her photos reemerged. In the 1980’s Ron Masucci took an interest in the glass negatives stored in the San Juan Avenue basement of Leah’s old home. Eventually, he’d print photographs from the glass plates and research the images. Former JHS Board Member Susan Masucci, grandniece of Leah, and Susan’s husband, Ron Masucci, donated Leah’s body of work, 4,075 glass plate negatives, to the JHS in 2006.

The exhibit is currently open Tuesdays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the society’s archival repository, Old St. Luke’s, until July 30th, 2015.

Aug
13
Thu
2015
The Spirit of ’45: A Home-front Retrospective
Aug 13 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Spirit of '45: A Home-front Retrospective @ Old St. Luke's Hospital | Jacksonville | Florida | United States

An exhibit opening with guest curator, Stephen Cargile.

The Jacksonville Historical Society pauses to reflect on the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, a war that forever changed our city, our nation and the world. The monumental local role in the effort is highlighted in an exhibit of photographs and objects from guest curator, Stephen Cargile. The exhibit also includes items from the society’s collections, including Merrill Family Liberty Ship images.

The exhibit opens on August 13th at 5:30pm and runs through Veteran’s Day, November 11th. It will be housed at the society’s archives, Old St. Luke’s, 314 Palmetto Street. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

This exhibit and the 2015-16 JHS program series is generously sponsored by Retina Associates, P.A., Dr. Fred H. Lambrou, Jr.

 

Copyright © 2019 by Jacksonville Historical Society

THE JACKSONVILLE HISTORICAL SOCIETY