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Author Archive | JaxHistory

Remembering Hurricane Dora

Even before Hurricane Dora’s eye moved ashore in Northeast Florida just after midnight on September 10, 1964, much of the new Jacksonville Beach Pier was destroyed by winds. While Dora caused no deaths in Jacksonville, buildings throughout North Florida were severely damaged or lost. At the beaches, bulkheads were destroyed and 43 homes were lost […]

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What’s in a name? How the city and its streets got theirs.

For 10,000 years Native Americans lived along the St. Johns River and at some point referred to its waters by a variety of names, including Welaka, “river of lakes”. It is recorded that natives called the narrow St. Johns River crossing at today’s downtown Jacksonville, Wacca Pilatka, meaning “place of cow’s crossing.” By default, the […]

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Comic con and Graphic Novels: Adventures in the Archives

by Taryn Rodriguez-Boette Many of you might be following the latest Comic Con event this summer. For the uninitiated, “Comic Con” is the acronym of Comic Book Conventions – events “dedicated for the appreciation of Uncle Toms Cabincomics and related art forms and the historic and ongoing contribution of comics to art and culture.” Although […]

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Introducing Our 2016 Board Nominees

At JHS’s Annual Meeting, which was held Tuesday, May 24th, at 6:30 p.m., the membership approved our slate of new board nominees. We would like to introduce you to these three outstanding inviduals: Michael Fackler Michael Fackler earned his undergraduate degree in history with a focus on African History from Northwestern University in 1994. From 1996-98, […]

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115 Years After the Great Fire . . .

Pre-fire buildings and post-fire masterpieces are still threatened May 3 is arguably the most important day in city history. It’s the anniversary of Jacksonville’s Great Fire of 1901. This year, Jacksonville marks 115 years since the conflagration wiped out 2,368 homes and buildings in eight hours. The fire began in the LaVilla area and rapidly […]

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A. Philip Randolph: Celebrating a Jacksonville Legend

A. Philip Randolph was one of the most influential African American leaders of the twentieth century, and arguably one of the most historically important figures ever to emerge from Jacksonville. An outspoken advocate for equality, Randolph took a leading role in efforts to expose unfair working conditions as well as discrimination in the armed forces; his leadership was critical to the […]

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A Remarkable Gift: Delores Barr Weaver’s grant in perpetuity begins in 2015

Delores Barr Weaver recently announced a remarkable gift to the Jacksonville Historical Society and 19 other area organizations. Beginning in 2015, the society along with the other non-profit groups will receive an annual $10,000 grant in perpetuity. For the Historical Society, the grant punctuates two decades of generous support by Mrs. Weaver. The innovative grant […]

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People’s Choice Winners

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea*, inspired by the famous Jules Verne novel, was the far-and-away winner of the People’s Choice award at JHS’s 12th Annual Gingerbread House Extravaganza, which concluded December 23, 2014. This was the vote cast by people who attended the Extravaganza and were asked to select their favorite gingerbread house/creation. Built by […]

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A Different Kind of Gingerbread House

This December, as the Jacksonville Historical Society celebrates its 13th annual Gingerbread Extravaganza, we’re reminded of one of the most elaborately decorated homes ever built in Jacksonville—one whose extravagant, exuberant ornamentation surely is deserving of the term “Gingerbread” architecture. When this house was first built in 1872 on (what would become) Riverside Avenue, much of […]

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If you want to be historically accurate this holiday, serve alligator

In the autumn of 1621, in celebration of their first successful corn harvest, the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony hunted wildfowl and held a feast that was attended by local members of the Wampanoag Tribe, which contributed five deer. History books and countless American schoolchildren know this communal meal as the famous “First Thanksgiving.” Except that […]

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